Call your doctor for a screening. Or call one of ours:

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Brett Ruffo, MD

Director, Colorectal Surgery
For consultation, call: 
631-727-5065

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Mark J. Coronel, MD, PC

Director, Endoscopy
For consultation, call:
631-591-3000


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Don’t get mad. Get screened.

It’s how you can prevent pre-cancerous polyps from turning into cancer. You owe it to the people you love to get yourself screened… and get them screened too. It’s something you’ll never regret. 

Get Screened 

So you can be there for the people you love

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in the United States, and that ought to make you mad, because colon cancer is preventable, treatable and beatable.

With regular screenings, your doctors can treat and eliminate the polyps and pre-cancerous conditions that can lead to cancer. With early detection, recovery rates are near 100%. Those are odds you can live with.

Colon cancer screenings are covered by most insurance plans with little or no out of pocket expense to you. Make an appointment to get screened today!

Let’s make colon cancer history…
Call 631-548-6320 today.
 

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Who Should Get Screened?

  • All men & women age 50 and over
  • Anyone at risk or with a family history of colon cancer should be screened more frequently
  • IF IN DOUBT, ASK YOUR FAMILY DOCTOR, OR CALL US TODAY: 631-548-6320


What Kind of Screening Do I Need?

There are different kinds and levels of screenings, depending on your age, condition and medical history. Talk to your doctor about which one is right for you.

Stool Test:
This basic method, called a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) checks your stool for blood, which can be a sign of pre-cancerous conditions.

Sigmoidoscopy:
Usually performed in your doctor’s office, this test uses a small, flexible viewing scope to look at the lower 30% of your large intestine, the sigmoid area, to assess the overall health of your colon. It is typically used in conjunction with a stool test.

Colonoscopy:
Usually performed under mild sedation, this test examines the entire length of the colon. Usually recommended for everyone, starting at age 50.

Virtual Colonoscopy:
In some cases, a CT scan can be used instead of a regular colonoscopy.