7 Ways to Prep Your Kitchen for Healthy Eating

Posted on February 15, 2016

With New Year’s resolutions in full swing, many people are jumping back on the healthy eating bandwagon. After a long day of work, it’s easy to fall back into unhealthy old habits once you get home. That is why it is so important to prep your kitchen in order to make healthy decisions easier to choose. Consider these ideas to transform your kitchen routine:

  1. Pre-cut fruits and vegetables. As soon as you get back from the store, take 10 minutes to prep some fruits and vegetables. You are much more likely to reach for a healthy snack if it is pre-cut and ready to go.iStock_000083019767_Small.jpg
  2. Invest in a well-stocked spice rack. Stocking up on spices makes it easy to create flavorful meals.
  3. Keep a list of the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen.” Each year, the Environmental Working Group releases a list of the “Dirty Dozen,” the agricultural products with the highest levels of pesticide residue. The Long Island medical center specialists at Peconic Bay recommend printing out a list of the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” to guide your organic shopping.
  4. Reduce your plastic container use. Plastic containers often contain bisphenol A (BPA). Animal studies suggest that products high in BPA may contribute to health problems. Whenever possible, avoid storing food in plastic containers. Instead, invest in glass storage containers or plastic containers that are BPA-free.
  5. Opt for skim dairy products. Making a simple switch from full-fat dairy products to nonfat can save major calories. If you just can’t stand skim milk, 1% is a good compromise between the creaminess of whole milk with the health benefits of nonfat.
  6. Stock up on healthy canned foods. Canned foods are a great way to get nutrients when it has been a while since you made it to the grocery store. Stock up on canned beans, vegetables and fatty fish (think tuna, mackerel or trout).
  7. Be careful when using nonstick pans. Nonstick pans are fantastic for their ability to fry eggs without making a mess. However, several scientific studies suggest that fluoropolymers, which are found in nonstick coatings, may be dangerous to human health. Never use metal utensils on the pan surface and be vigilant about cracks or scratches, which are signs it is time to throw a pan away.

Altering your dietary habits is an investment in your long-term health. For help along the way, contact our nutrition experts at Peconic Bay Medical Center. We can help you make simple modifications to make healthy eating a regular habit. Call us today to learn more.

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